Caves

Namakdan Cave in Qeshm Island is one of the masterpieces of creation. The cave is an appropriate place for treating those who suffer from asthma and respiratory problems.With a height of 237 meters and length of over 6,000 meters, this natural attraction is considered as the largest salt cave worldwide.
Given its interior salt stalactites and crystals, and saltwater flow outside, Namakdan Cave displays eye-catching scenery as every part of this natural attraction offers a unique view. The cave, 90 km off Qeshm Island, has several major and minor passages, first of which is located 670 meters from the entrance. The underground water, which erupts in the cave, flows on mountain slopes in the form of a salt spring.
Inside the caves are completely dark and you have to bright flashlight in order to visit crystalline salts. The ceiling has been covered by marble and crystal in different forms and they have created a novel perspective. Salt water flowing on the floor of the cave is also a pleasant view.
Ordinary people only can travel 100 meters into the cave due to lack of technical equipments.
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Ghar Parau is a cave in the Zagros Mountains, north of Kermanshah in Western Iran.[3] It is the second deepest cave in Iran.(The Deepest cave in Iran is Jojar Cave with the depth of -806 meter and exploration in that cave is still continious.) Parau cave was registered as a National Natural Monument by Mr. Farshad Fattahi in Department of Environment of Iran.
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.Alisadr is the world’s biggest water cave, where you sit in a boat and watch the view. This cave is located at 48°18’E 35°18’N, in the southern part of Ali Sadr village. The cave is entered at the side of a hill called Sari Ghiyeh which also includes two other caves called Sarab and Soubashi, each 7 and 11 kilometers from Ali Sadr Cave. Apparently, the water in Ali Sadr cave stems from a spring in Sarab.In the summer of 2001, a German/British expedition surveyed the cave, finding to be 11 kilometers long.[2] The main chamber of the cave is 100 meters by 50 meters and 40 meters high.The cave walls can extend up to 40 meters high, and it contains several large, deep lakes. The cave has a river flowing through it and most travel through the cave system is done by boat. More than 11 kilometers of the cave’s water canals have been discovered so far. Some routes are 10 to 11 kilometers long and all lead to “The Island”, a centrally located large atrium.
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The Huto and Kamarband Caves or Belt Caves are prehistoric, archaeological sites in Iran. They are located 100 meters apart, in a cliff on the slopes of the Alborz mountains in the village of Tarujen (currently called Shahid Abad), 5 km. south west of Behshahr.
Excavations took place led by Carleton S. Coon and were reported on between 1949-1957.Huto Cave is approximately 30 m. x 20 m. The site produced pottery shards, stone tools and samples for radio-carbon dating. Twenty-two samples were dated from Huto Cave and grouped into eight different cultures. The 2 earliest cultures, dating to c. 9910 B.C. – 7,240 B.C. were thought to be seal hunters and vole eaters. The bones of a dog have been cited as an example of exceptionally early animal domestication.
Sub-Neolithic finds date to c. 6120 B.C.Kamarband cave is notable for three human skeletons discovered there, dating to approximately 9000 years B.C. Other finds included flint blades, walrus and deer bones, giving valuable information about human development from the ice age in the Mazandaran area.
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Katale Khor is a cave located in Zanjan Province, Iran. It is situated 120 km south of Zanjan city and is about 410 km from Tehran. The name, Katale Khor, means “mount of the sun.Geological studies in 1984 showed that the cave formation dates back to the Jurassic period. It is believed that the cave is connected to Ali Sadr Cave in Hamadan province. The road from Zanjan to Khatale Khor passes Soltaniyeh, an ancient Ilkhanid city.
The cave was discovered about 90 years ago
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.Quri Qale Cave is a cave located northwest of Ravansar, Iran, and is one of the longest caves in western Asia. First explored in the 1950s, in 1989 it was further opened by an Iranian team. It contains three main chambers, with calcite crystals, stalactites and waterfalls. It is known for its colony of mouse ear bats, and for a number of archaeological finds, including silver plates dating the late Sassanian period.

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